Gas Transmission Integrity Management: Performance Measure Reporting

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Protecting America’s High Consequence Areas (HCAs)

Beginning in 2004, gas transmission pipeline operators have been required to submit performance measure reports for pipeline infrastructure covered by Integrity Management (IM) programs. PHMSA uses data from these reports—due on March 15th for the previous calendar year—to monitor and report on industry progress in meeting the requirements of the Gas Transmission IM Rule, to prioritize operators for future agency inspections, and to respond to inquiries about PHMSA’s oversight program.

Gas Transmission Integrity Management Performance and Assessment

Gas Transmission IM Performance shows the trend for HCA miles, Significant Incidents, Failures, and Leaks per HCA mile. By clicking a calendar year, you can view the data submitted by each operator. The causes of Significant Incidents, Failures, and Leaks in HCA are also shown. The definitions below provide additional details about the performance measures. Starting in 2010, operators began submitting this data separately for inTERstate and inTRAstate pipelines. Also, the data is submitted by-State for inTRAstate pipelines. Use the Inter/Intra prompt and State prompt to tailor the reports to the data you want to see.

Gas Transmission IM Assessment shows the trend for HCA miles, HCA assessments, both baseline and reassessment, and HCA repairs. The definitions below provide additional details about the assessment measures. Starting in 2010, operators began submitting this data separately for inTERstate and inTRAstate pipelines. Also, the data is submitted by-State for inTRAstate pipelines. Use the Inter/Intra prompt and State prompt to tailor the reports to the data you want to see.



Definitions:

Assessment may include more than one tool, device, or test to inspect a particular pipeline. An assessment is complete when all of the required tools, devices, or tests have successfully evaluated the pipeline.

Significant Incidents are reports from gas transmission operators that include a fatality or personal injury requiring in-patient hospitalization and those with property damage greater than $50,000 in 1984 dollars.

Leaks are unintentional escapes of gas from the pipeline that are not reportable as Incidents. A non-hazardous release that can be eliminated by lubrication, adjustment, or tightening is not a leak. Operators should report the number of leaks repaired based on the best data they have available. For sections replaced but retired in place, operators should consider leak survey information to determine, to the extent practical, the number of leaks in the replaced section.

Failure is defined in ASME/ANSI B31.8S as a general term used to imply that a part in service: has become completely inoperable, is still operable but is incapable of satisfactorily performing its intended function; or has deteriorated seriously, to the point that it has become unreliable or unsafe for continued use. Failures that result in an unintentional release of gas should be reported as leaks.

Immediate Repair – More specifically defined in 49 CFR 192.933(d)(1), these repairs are deemed important enough to require a temporary reduction in operating pressure or shutdown until such time as the urgent repair is completed.

Scheduled Condition Repair – More specifically defined in 49 CFR 192.933(c), (d)(2), and (d)(3), these repairs include One-year and Monitored Conditions, as well as other scheduled conditions, and are deemed less urgent than Immediate Repairs. These repairs are to be prioritized for completion according to an operator-defined schedule based on 49 CFR 192.933(c).

Pressure Test Failure Repair – These repairs result when failures occur due to pressure tests conducted by operators.